About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
KQED (PBS) 14
LANGUAGE
English 14
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
$1.9 billion to settle u.s. allegations of money laundering. our chief economics correspondent has all the details. >> the largest bank in money- laundering, cartels washed through the bank. it resulted in a $1.9 billion fine, the biggest in u.s. banking history. the american authorities >> the corruption of the financial system by drug traffickers and other criminals, and free evading u.s. sanctions and law. >> they find $7 billion will be transferred between mexico and the u.s.. there were 25,000 transactions involving iran. in $290 million in suspicious traveler's checks were cleared by the bank. in a statement, they said they were story -- sorry for past mistakes. the former chairman was appointed as trade minister for david cameron. he had this to say when the allegations emerged in july. >> there were failures of the implementation, they expressed regret for that. it is a company i am proud to have worked for. >> they are not the only british bank to run these. the accusations of sanctions violations. other leading european banks have also in recent years reached settlements
to some useful resources on our website. we hope it can be of some help today in the wake of this devastating tragedy. we move now to tonight's discussion. and joining me on the panel are aarti kohli, senior fellow at uc berkeley's warren institute on war and social policy. paul rogers, environmental writer with the "san jose mercury news." stephen sock, investigative reporter with nbc bay area. and from los angeles, david lazarus, columnist with "the l.a. times." aurti, let's start with you. uc berkeley announced a new scholarship program for undocumented students. why did the university feel it was necessary to support these students? >> well, yes it's very excites news. $1 million from the foundation. and the university really feels strong obligation to these students because they're one of the most vulnerable set of students that we have. the average family income for these students is $24,000 a year. they're not eligible for federal financial aid. they're not eligible for pell grants. and so they've overcome great odds just to get to berkeley and we want to keep them
a new constitution that opponents fear it could be used to impose islamic values. this is a series of marches. two weeks in and than not lost any of their fury and egger prodi is done. >-- and anger at what he has done. >> he is not right to be the new king creative. >> we hope he is wise enough to realize that today is the first of many marches against him if he does not stop them. >> the president seeing here receiving the new draft of the constitution had to be hustled out of the palace for his safety. egyptians have lost their fear. >> we've never seen anything like this in egypt. i have covered for the president for 20 years and i could not dare walk in from the palace without having a sense of fear inside me. >> tonight the opponents are still outside the presidential palace. his supporters staged their own show over the weekend. in egypt is divided. as the country approaches a referendum on the constitution less than two weeks away. >> tense time in egypt. nato is stepping up its protection of turkey as the conflict in syria at trends to escalate. the military alliance has b
, this is 40. joining us paul rudd, leslie mann and judd apatow. >> i think it is a couple that my own opinion is that they love each other and they're deal well problems that a lot of marriages deal with. and maybe they're just handling it in the wrong way sometimes. and i think they're kind of succumbing to the pressures of all of it. >> like paul said we kind of share a brain and so we, you know, we have a shorthand with each other, with all of it. and we have i mean we're constantly having conversations about what we are-- about screens and these characters. >> it is person. we debate all the time how truthful it is, and how personal it is. and some days it is like this is really personal, this isn't like us at all. so we change our opinion moment to moment,. >> rose: al hunt, julianna goldman, george stevens, paul rud, leslie mann and paul apatow when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following kohl qol captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. . >> rose: we're in washington where fiscal cliff negotiatio
they are moving too slowly, and could fragment. the police took us on patrol to see the violent side of an intractable political battle about the country's future. >> mostly teenagers. they are pushed by higher leaders. >> demonstrators opposed videos on youtube of what they do. the police said there was fun, using only -- police said they used force only to protect civilians. but we went to a protest about what they said were punitive and violent police raids. one of the demonstrators is still waiting to have dozens of shotgun pellets removed from what he said was the police attack and weeks ago. >> we want only freedom. we will come back and back and back. we want freedom. >> these people are shia muslims, the majority in bahrain. they are calling for the downfall of the king. like most of the ruling class, he is sunni muslim. the children reacted fastest when the police moved in. in the she of villages -- shia villages, demonstrations happened to him daily, even though they were banned. bahrain is caught up in big forces of work in the middle east. the pressure for change. the int
anything to us. we have to make our own music, we have to make music for our generation, for our friends. >> rose: right. >> and it is not -- we are going to wipe the slate clean. >> rose: gustavo dudamel and david byrne when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: maestro gustavo dudamel is here, berlin philharmonic once called him the most astonishingly talented conductor industry ever come across. he is beloved bolivar orchestra in vendz well, ven venezuela anw is with the la philharmonic. ♪ >> rose: he is in new york to, bolivar orchestra in carnegie called, voices from latin america, also dedicated further musical education and social justice around the world, i am pleased to have gustavo dudamel at this table for the first time. >> thank you. it is an honor. >> rose: my pleasure. >> huge honor. >> rose: we have been wanting to do this for a while. tell me about the music you have selected for the performance. >> yes. this is a festival called
been violent clashes for the second day outside the presidential power us -- palace in cairo. demonstrators have been during petrol bombs. four senior advisers have resigned. what are the chances for a peaceful resolution? that is the question i asked the state department spokesman p.j. crowley. >> we have had the former head of the iaea suggesting that morsi is now worse than hosni mubarak. is getting quite tense there, isn't it? >> it is. and the tension between institutions is actually potentially constructive. and every faction is sending their groups into the streets, or the muslim brotherhood is sending dogs to intimidate the court. this could create a very tense situation and potentially spiral out of control. >> how accurate are those comments about morsi? >> we do not know yet. none of those statements necessarily mean there is anything other than competition. you have the court stopped with mubarak appointees, but nonetheless, you have the other branches of government. . there's also the definition of the future of egyptian society. >> i was interested to see what y
international correspondent reported two years ago. she is back there for us tonight. >> outside the governor's office there is another -- photos of when he set himself on fire years ago. no one paid attention. he still has the scars. now he is on hunger strike. this place is to our south of the capital. it is full of desperate young men. you can feel it at the hollywood cafe. nothing, nothing has changed, this man says. there are still in their jobs. all the leverage -- all the revolution brought to us was freedom of expression. that anger boiled over on the streets here last week. tunisia is resolution began in the marginal areas just like this. the same frustration still fester. two years ago, i visited his grieving mother in their hometown. this time, i met her in her new home in the capital. her family had to move. her son, the icon of the revolution, is now resented by many. >> do not question my son's death. that was god's will. people are still struggling. the government is doing nothing for them. ♪ [applause] to uneasy head does have its first freely elected party -- tunisia does h
. >> the interpreter: gation they are using extreme measures, you know, water boarding, and even within that scene without a lot of dialogue i found to be really compelling, to think of playing that, you know, as an actor and to start from there to see where, as the journey goes on she descends the rabbit hole and becomes a stranger to herself, this life that she knew, like a shadow. >> rose: she loses herself in her mission. >> yeah, until the very end when the pilot asks her where do you want to go there is this moment of not knowing where she can go or even who she is, and it is such a big question for maya at the end. >> rose: who is she? >> well, i don't think she knows who she is, you know, because -- >> rose: or where she goes from there. >> exactly, she lived her whole life with this one goal, what happens, and what means did she use to achieve that goal, and what does that make her now that is over? >> rose:. >> where do we go now? the movie ends with a question, and it is unanswer unanswered which i think is really commendable. >> rose: what was the hardest part about filming? >> being
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)